Two-wheel round-up

For as long as I can remember, I loved motorcycles. It was a love not shared by many other people in my life. Still, I always wanted one, and dreamed of one day riding one.

Here is a post to introduce my 6 babies.

The first bike I owned was an almost-brand-new Yamaha Virago. Some guy bought it and then had buyer’s remorse after a few weeks, and traded it back at the shop. I took it home with less than 600 km on it. It was a measly 250 cc little thing. For my first bike, I wanted something sensible, not too expensive, not too fast, not too heavy.

Virago again ViragoThe thing with a “sensible” bike is, I was bored of it after 2 months. A 250 cc engine is fine for riding around in the city, but lacking on the highway. I rode everyday of the week, and was getting comfortable enough to want a bigger bike. I sold it to a lady from Vancouver Island. She met me at the ferry terminal and took the shiny bike home.

Next, I bought a 1988 Honda Hurricane 600 from some kid in North Van. It was my first sport bike. The original color was white and grey. Whoever re-built the bike painted it yellow and grey. I loved that full fairing look. Now I’m officially “cool” because I’m riding a sport bike.

I rode the crap out of that bike. I rode to Squamish after work at least 3 times a week, and up to Duffy Lake maybe once a week. I also rode this thing to Prince George, Calgary, a trip to California all over western Washington, and a couple of times on the Island. I also hit the pavement for the first time on this bike up in Sechelt. I think I will always look back at this bike as my favorite. It was so forgiving, comfortable, and all around just a fun bike to ride.

Hurricanehurricane crashedhurricane_

Once I started to plan a cross-country trip, I had all these ideas in my head that the Hurricane won’t make it. It had 78,000 km on the clock, which is quite a bit for an old bike. Looking back, the bike was performing flawlessly. A new set of tires would have been enough to get me across the country. Nonetheless, I was young and stupid and lusted after newer and prettier things. I sold the Hurricane in favor of a much newer sport touring bike–the 2004 Yamaha FZ6.

FZ6 Duffy Lake FZ6

I took the FZ6 across the country. It had a touring shield, a hard Givi case, and I added a set of Nelson Rigg saddle bags and duffel bag. I took this baby across the country and rode over 6,000 km in 10 days.

Even though this bike was shiny and beautiful and we went through a lot together, I wasn’t in love with this bike. It just always felt cold to me. Like there is no soul. There was no connection. It was a flawless machine, but that was it.

Then I get the idea that I might ride up to Alaska. I was then on the hunt for a dirt bike that will take me there. I went through the trouble and imported a Suzuki DR400, owned it for all of 2 months, barely rode it, then sold it because I had change my mind about Alaska.

DR2

At the rate I’m going through bikes, I am just surprised that Cliff hasn’t divorced me.

Then I want to get out of sport bikes because I felt like I was getting old. I wanted a “dual sport”, which is good for both road and dirt riding. I watched the “Long Way Round” series and I was totally inspired to ride one of those bikes. Even though I was 34, I was acting like a 5-year-old. I wanted whatever I saw on TV. So I sold the FZ6, flew down to Oregon, and rode this 2001 BMW Dakar home.

Dakar

I didn’t have much saddle time on the Dakar. We adopted Sam. We got into hiking, went to hike the Inca Trail and climb Kilimanjaro. The next summer I went to volunteer in Botswana for a month. Life was busy and I was away a lot. And then the biological clock started to kick in, and I wanted a baby.

I sold the Dakar when I was 3 months pregnant with Joshua in my belly. I watched the buyer ride the bike away and cried. I loved that bike, and would have totally kept it. But we were in a very new territory in our lives, I didn’t want to have to keep and maintain a bike for an indefinite amount of time.

For the next four years, my life was turned upside down (in the most amazing way) by two little human beings. Earlier this year, I finally felt like we’re in a place stable enough to start thinking about riding again. So I bought a 2009 BMW F800ST. It’s the biggest bike I’ve ever ridden with an 800 cc engine. I love that it is fuel injected and a belt drive. The less maintenance the better!

Duffy Lake loop motorcycle ride-6422

 

So far this bike has been up and down the coast a decent amount, as good as schedule with two kids allow. I do enjoy how low maintenance it is. It is certain refreshing to not clean up chain lube around tire rims anymore.

There you have it, a round-up of my babies.

Day 310/365 {fat girl}

When I graduated from elementary school in Taiwan, it was a trend to have all your friends write a few words and leave their contact info in a cute notebook.

When I was in Taiwan visiting family last week, I helped my mom clean out some storage boxes. In one of the boxes was my cutesy little notebook, full of my friends’ 12-year-old writing and mug shots. Ah, how nostalgic…until I started flipping through the pages.

The one common theme of all the well wishes is that all my friends wished I would successfully lose weight. I was repeated referred to as the “fat girl”.

As a chubby 12-year-old, my friends called me “fat girl”. My dad often pointed to obese people on the street and said one day I will become like them. My mom sometimes sent me to school with nothing but steamed vegetables in my lunch box to help me lose weight. It was cemented in my mind at a young age that I am fat. Even if I didn’t think that I was fat, I had enough people telling me I was fat.

I’m not bitter or angry about any of this history, because I choose not to be. I certainly didn’t write this post to cry a sad river about my childhood. I have enough awesome things going on in my life to realize that I’m more than just a fat girl. However, that doesn’t mean it is easy to change the way I think about myself. It takes so much energy to fight the negativity wired in my brain about being fat.

I just wanted to be vulnerable and share this little piece of carefully guarded hurt with you.

 

This boy wrote, "......In the 6th grade, this fat girl sat in front of me (well, maybe not too fat). But this fat girl was pretty kind to people. Lastly, I wish this fat girl will become skinnier."

This boy wrote, “……In the 6th grade, this fat girl sat in front of me (well, maybe not too fat). But this fat girl was pretty kind to people. Lastly, I wish this fat girl will become skinnier.”

Day 309/365 {fair}

I’m in a few mommies discussion groups on Facebook. In one particular group, a mom posed a question today: If you have two kids, how do you ensure you are “fair” with both of them?

It sparked a lot of responses from various moms about how to be “fair”, how to make sure you give the same type of toy to each child, give the same amount of time and energy to each, etc. It reminded me how my parents always tried to be “fair”, which really meant my brother and I ended up with two of the same toys so we don’t fight.

Since I had Savanna, this is something I have been trying to grapple with. It started with the 3D ultrasound, before she was even born. When I was pregnant with Josh, I had 3D ultrasound done. I bought a $150 package, which came with a CD of the still images of Josh as a fetus. But when I was pregnant with Savanna, I really wanted the $200 package which came with a video. Should I pay the same price and get the same package so it’s “fair” for both kids? So when they’re all grown up and compare notes, Josh won’t feel like he was ripped off because he didn’t get a video from his 3D ultrasound?

It has taken me a while to come to this conclusion: being fair is over-rated.

So what if I bought the same ultrasound package for both kids, put the same amount of RESP away for them, buy the same brand and model of car seat for them, make sure they got the same snacks in the same amount, and spent the same amount of time with each of them? Yes, I’d be totally “fair”. But I would have also totally missed the point of having two children who are individuals with different needs and desires.

I don’t think I’ll ever be a super mom who can manage to be “fair”. It will always be in the back of my mind that I need to be fair, but I think the reality is that I’m human and I will love my kids differently. My relationship with Josh will always be different from my relationship with Savanna. I have decided that I’m ok with that.Angela Chang Photography Day 309 of 365

Tokyo cycling tour

The last time we went to Tokyo, I was pregnant with Savanna and feeling very sick and miserable. There were certain things I enjoyed about Tokyo, but mostly I felt tired and ill. So we thought we’d try it again this year. And this time, I wanted to do something a little different.

One day, I googled “tokyo cycling tour” just to see what would pop up. Luckily for me, I found a company called “Tokyo Great Cycling Tour“. We booked their “Tokyo Bay Ride” tour, which is a 6-hour tour that takes you around Tokyo bay and over many bridges.

We booked two bikes for Cliff and I, and also a trailer to haul the kids. Thank goodness they hooked up the trailer to Cliff’s bike, because I am pretty sure I couldn’t have hauled both kids through the entire tour.

We have this same trailer at home, and we’re used to seeing this set-up in Vancouver. But in Tokyo this is a rare sight. So every pedestrian points to Cliff pulling the kids and comment on how cute it is (“kawaeeeee”, they’d say).

The tour overs 23 km of riding, which isn’t difficult. Most of the terrain was fairly flat except for when we go up the bridges. Still, there were enough sight seeing breaks that you never feel like you’re peddling forever. For 10 of us, there were 2 guides (Henna and Su). We stopped often while they explained history and new developments in the city to us.

These ladies were top notch with their services. They had a big book of pictures and timelines to help with explaining history, they pulled out ice cream filled puffs to feed us, they constantly filled our water bottles with icy cold water, they brought fish food so our kids can feed the fish in the ponds, they handed out homemade ginger ale, they bought us ice cream at the park, and ended the day with beer and snacks in their office. They were so attentive and considerate. They are the examples of what customer service is.

I would totally go back and do this again in a heart beat!

Welcome

Welcome

Getting ready to ride

Getting ready to ride

First stop on a bridge

First stop on a bridge

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Stopping at the fish market to get fresh tuna

Stopping at the fish market to get fresh tuna

Delicious, melt-in-your-mouth, tuna sashimi

Delicious, melt-in-your-mouth, tuna sashimi

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Ice cream puffs

Ice cream puffs

Somebody was a little tired

Somebody was a little tired

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Lunch break at the beach

Lunch break at the beach

Picnic lunch

Picnic lunch

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Boat ride over the bay

Boat ride over the bay

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Graveyard for babies :(

Graveyard for babies :(

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Tokyo Tower

Tokyo Tower

She slept through this stop and missed ice cream.

She slept through this stop and missed ice cream.

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A very satisfied customer

A very satisfied customer